What Can I Plant Now?

If you are direct sowing outdoors, scatter seed evenly in shallow trenches, then cover the seeds by raking fine soil over them to the recommended depth, and firm the seed in with the back of the rake. Seeds must make close contact with the soil to germinate. Generally, seeds should be sown to a depth from two to four times their diameter.

Planting spring vegetables and flowers is a task many gardeners relish. After spending a long winter indoors, gardeners are anxious to step outside and get their hands in the dirt. There’s a numerous variety of both vegetable and flower seeds that you can plant right now. With a stretch of warm and above average temperatures on the horizon, now’s the time to plant vegetable and flower seeds. But slow down a tad, don’t just rush out and buy two or three packs of this and that and toss them in the ground. In order to get the most out of your seedlings, there are a few things you should know and need to have on hand.

Vegetable and Flower Gardening Tools and Seeds at Goffle Brook Farms in Ridgewood NJFirst and foremost you need to build (or in this case grow) upon a solid foundation, and that means amending your soil to maximize root growth and plant health. We recommend utilizing Bumper Crop Organic Soil Amendment to establish a growing medium within which your seedlings will flourish and as a result be more productive and yield more fruit, vegetable or flower. When planting seeds, dig your trench or hole slightly deeper than what is called for and place some of the soil amendment on the bottom, then plant your seeds to the desired depth and fill in with the soil amendment, slightly tamp the soil, water and cover with remaining soil.

No matter what your gardening level is, there are a few absolutely essential tools. For starters, investing in some sturdy gardening gloves is vital. For example, coated gloves offer dexterity when performing tasks such as planting seeds. You should have a sturdy trowel is designed to cut through clods and dig deep to seeds, plant bulbs and annuals, or perennials.

So now that you have an idea of what you should do, make a list from the seed planting guidelines below and head on over to the garden center, bring the kids along because gardening is a great learning experience for them also, and pick up your seeds and whatever else you need. Our professional and knowledgeable staff will be happy to assist you and get you on the way to a “green thumb“.

FROST DATES FOR RIDGEWOOD, NJ

Last Spring Frost – April 22 • First Fall Frost – October 16

Vegetables and Herbs

A frost date is the average date of the last light freeze in spring or the first light freeze in fall.

The classification of freeze temperatures is based on their effect on plants:

Light freeze: 29° to 32°F (1.7° to 0°C)—tender plants are killed.
Moderate freeze: 25° to 28°F (3.9° to -2.2°C)—widely destructive to most vegetation.
Severe freeze: 24°F (-4.4°C) and colder—heavy damage to most garden plants.

Note that frost dates are an estimate based on historical climate data and are not set in stone. The probability of a frost occurring after the spring frost date or before the fall frost date is 30%, which means that there is still a chance of frost occurring before or after the given dates!

4 To 6 Weeks Before

2 To 4 Weeks Before

Baby Greens • Spinach

Broccoli

Cabbage – Head

Chamomile

Chevil

Chives

Endives

Mustard

Onion – Bulb

Onion – Shallot

Parsley

Peas

Summer Radish

Rutabaga

Arugula

Baby Greens

Bok Choy

Beets

Carrot

Catnip

Collards

Leek

Lettuce

Mesclun

Swiss Chard

Turnip

Watercress

Wild Bergamot

1 To 2 Weeks Before

Borage

Cauliflower

Celery

Chinese Broccoli

Cilantro

Dill

Kale

Marjoram

Sorrel

Romanesco – broccoli

Botanical Interest and Livingston Vegetable and Flower Seeds Available at Goffle Brook Farms in Ridgewood NJ

Flowers and Ornamentals

4 To 6 Weeks Before

2 To 4 Weeks Before

Bluebonnet

Columbine

Feverfew

Flax Blue | Breezy

Gaillardia

Larkspur

Lavender

Mustard

Lupine Pixie Delight

Pansy

Poppy

Snapdragon

Sweet Pea

Viola

Bee Balm

Bells of Ireland

Black Eyed Susan

Bluebells California

Calendra

Cleome

Echinacea

Flower Mix

Love In A Mist

Milkweed

Phlox

Shasta Daisy

Verbascum

Verbena

1 To 2 Weeks Before

African Daisy

Alyssum

Bachelor’s Button

Carnation

Chinese Lantern

Coreopsis

Flax – scarlet

Forget Me Not

Ice Plant

Linaria

Painted Daisy

Salpiglossis

Growing plants from seeds is not only easy to do but is also one of the cheapest ways to fill your garden with abundance. Some people may only think of growing vegetables from seeds, but flowers are just as easy to plant. As a bonus, you'll have a greater choice of variety and color

Direct Sowing: Starting Seeds Outdoors

Prepare Soil – Use a rake or hand fork to loosen soil. Break apart large soil clumps, and remove debris, such as sticks, rocks and roots. Add amendments to soil, such as fertilizer and organic matter, to create the most ideal growing situation. Finish by creating a level surface.

Dig In – Most seed packets describe planting depth. The rule of thumb is to plant at a depth equal to three times the seed diameter. There are exceptions. Some seeds require light to germinate and should rest on top of soil. Press such seeds firmly against soil using a board or trowel to ensure that moisture cradles the seeds.

Moisture Matters – After planting, water seeds with a gentle mist or shower. Avoid using a strong splash or spray, which can dislodge seeds. It’s vital to keep soil consistently moist. In a sunny spot, this may mean watering twice a day.

Stake The Spot – Mark planting areas, especially if they’re tucked between existing plantings. Use garden markers, stakes and string, tall sticks, plastic cutlery — anything that clearly defines where seeds are buried.

Identify Seedlings – Learn what your seedlings will look like so you don’t mistakenly pull them as weeds. Some seed packets show seedling appearance; you can also find illustrations or photos online. When in doubt, let the seedling remain until you know for sure if it’s friend or foe.

Thin Seedlings – Thin seedlings as directed on the seed packet. You’ll disturb roots less if, instead of pulling seedlings you’re removing, you snip seedlings at the soil line with a fingernail or a tiny pair or snips or scissors.

Watch For Pests –  Keep an eye out for and protect seedlings against Slugs, Snails, Cutworms and other insect pests.

Bergen County’s Best Kept Gardening Secret

Goffle Brook Farms – Garden Center/Farmer’s Market

425 Goffle Road Ridgewood,NJ 0745
(201) 652-7540